China IPA strange and fascinating story is unfolding right now in the world of Chinese reality television programming. One of the most popular shows in China, The Voice of China, is embroiled in legal controversy, and the outcome could affect every single content license in China. Okay, that might be a bit of hyperbole, but still, this is one episode you won’t want to miss.

The story begins back in 2012, when Shanghai Canxing Culture & Broadcast Co. (上海灿星文化传播有限公司) licensed the format for The Voice from Dutch media entity Talpa. Talpa had originated the format back in 2010 with The Voice of Holland and has since licensed the hugely popular singing competition to more than 60 countries, including the U.S. where it is simply known as The Voice.

The Voice of China began airing in July 2012 on Zhejiang Television, and quickly became one of the most popular television shows in China. Though the English name followed the usual naming convention, the Chinese name of the show was 中国好声音, which translates, more or less, as “China’s Best Voice.”

Guess who didn’t register the Chinese name of the show? That would be Talpa. It’s depressing how often we have to repeat this: please, please, please register both your English-language trademark AND the Chinese version. By now, any company that gets caught flat-footed on this issue only has themselves (or their IP counsel) to blame.

Meanwhile, starting in 2012, the Chinese government agency overseeing media and censorship (currently known as SAPPRFT, for State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television), which had always restricted foreign content in China, began to announce even more directives regulating foreign film and television content, including specific limitations on when and how often foreign content shows could air on television and on streaming sites, and even specific limitations on singing competition programs. News stories and commentary about these directives often singled out The Voice as a possible target, but Zhejiang vowed that the show would remain on the air, and so it did — and continued to be a ratings powerhouse.

In early 2016, license renewal talks broke down between Canxing and Talpa. According to Canxing, Talpa asked for an exorbitant royalty percentage and also tried to get Canxing to take a package of shows when all Canxing really wanted was The Voice. This latter negotiating ploy, if true, is hardly unique to this situation; the dismal choice faced by Canxing is familiar to anyone who’s been a cable subscriber.

After Canxing ended the talks unilaterally, Talpa quickly licensed the format to another Zhejiang-based Chinese production company, Zhejiang Tangde Film & TV Co., Ltd. (浙江唐德影视股份有限公司), and Talpa and Tangde announced plans to produce seasons 5-8 of The Voice of China.

You think this story’s over but it’s ready to begin. Tune in the day after tomorrow for part two.