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The China Law Blog World Tour. Don’t Miss It.

Posted in Events

I am going to be speaking on China/International law a whole host of times between now and early November and since my first one is on Monday, now’s the time to tell you about them. So here goes.

On Monday, September 27, I am going to be live on Oregon public radio at some point between 8:40 a.m. and 9:40 a.m. PST. The show is “Think Out Loud” and the topic is “Global Trade in the Northwest.” The tagline for the show notes that Oregon has shipped more than $10 billion in products between January and July of this year and that “Washington is the most trade-dependent state in the nation.” 

On October 8, from 6 pm to 7 pm, I will be speaking in Seattle on the work my firm and I did in Japan for the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society on Peter Bethune’s criminal trial there. My talk is being co-sponsored by the Washington State Bar Association’s International Practice and Animal Law sections. I will be discussing the “legal and cultural issues” we faced on Peter’s case. Go here if you wish to register. 

On October 21, I will be speaking at the University of Washington School of Law on the nuts and bolts of being an international lawyer. I have given this relatively unscripted talk at a couple of law schools already and though I make no promises as to the quality, I will say I love doing it.   

Then, on October 25, I will be speaking at a National Business Institute Seminar on “The Legalities of Doing Business in China.” This seminar is being put on by the National Business Institute (NBI) from 9 am to $:30 pm at the Washington State Convention Center. I will be speaking on “Resolving Disputes with Chinese Parties,” discussing mostly how to sue and collect from Chinese companies. Al Clark of Davis Wright Tremaine will be speaking on “Labor Laws and Compliance,” William Fisher of Perkins Coie will be speaking on “IP Protection and Enforcement,” Frazier Mendel of Schwabe Williamson will be speaking on “Investment and Trade Regulations” and also on “Drafting FDI Documentation, Partnership and Outsourcing Agreements,” and Monica Gianni will be speaking on “Taxation Issues.” This is a great group of speakers and I am expecting an excellent conference. Go here to learn more and to register.

On November 1, I will be on a panel at the 2010 US China Business Conference in Atlanta. I will write more on this conference as it approaches, but wanted to say something on it now because early bird pricing ends on October 1. This is a big-time event and its speakers will include, among others, the following: 

 I am going to be on the “Building and Doing Business in China” panel. To register, go here

  • Leaf

    You are a busy fellow. I am hoping to make it to the Atlanta event and if I do, I will introduce myself to you.

  • http://borderbuster.blogspot.com/ Laurel Delaney

    Dan — Congratulations! This all looks super-exciting and rich with opportunities (possibilities) for you and your business. Keep up the fine work.
    All the best,
    Laurel

  • Sean

    I would love to hear the speech on the nuts and bolts of being an international lawyer. Is there anyway we could get the transcript? Or even better, you could just come to McGeorge in Sacramento and give the speech!

  • Megan

    Only an American would describe as a “World Tour” a series of speaking engagements that take place solely within the United States!!!

  • RS

    I’m interested in events like the Atlanta conference, but wonder whether the issues (and how to handle them from a resource standpoint) faced by a large multi-national corporation like Coca-Cola are so much different than those faced by a small, privately-held business that I should focus my limited resources on attending business seminars that give advice on how *small* businesses can get started up and maintain successful business operations in China? What’s your thought on this?
    And is this the kind of seminar that one attends if one is merely contemplating the possibility of whether to go to China, rather than if one is 95% sure that one is going to go, but the questions are just when and how?

  • http://www.chinalawblog.com Dan

    @ Leaf,
    That would be great. Thanks.

  • http://www.chinalawblog.com Dan

    Laurel,
    Thanks.
    Dan

  • http://www.chinalawblog.com Dan

    @ Sean,
    Sacramento ain’t that far…..

  • http://www.chinalawblog.com Dan

    @ Megan,
    I was being completely tongue in cheek, especially since Atlanta is the only place outside Seattle where I will be speaking.

  • http://www.chinalawblog.com Dan

    @ RS,
    I do not believe any seminar would be terribly helpful in deciding whether to go into China. They are much better for learning how best to operate in China.
    I think the decision of whether to go into China is the kind that requires research and analysis specific to your particular business.