register your trademark

A few months ago, I was email interviewed for a story on protecting intellectual property in China. I just learned today that the story is not going to run because it was “deemed too technical.”  Fine.

So instead I will list out below the points I made to my interviewer, who had sought me out

A few weeks ago, one of the lawyers in my office, emailed me an article co-written by a law school friend. The article was on trademark infringement in the clothing industry and on what clothing companies/fashion companies should do to protect their China trademarks, written by Yujing Shu and Hai-Ching Yang of KLGates. The note

As we have written many times over the years, if you are selling goods into China, sourcing goods from China, or even just doing business in China or with China, you probably should be registering a trademark in China for your logos and brand names. China is a first-to-file country and it requires no evidence

A reporter called me the other day on the Apple-Proview trademark kerfuffle. She kept wanting me to give her a quote on what foreign companies should take away from this dispute and I kept parrying with her, unable to give her just one. I kept finding myself saying “it’s probably more complicated than that.”

Earlier this year, I wrote an article for the Alaska Bar Magazine [link no longer exists] on China’s trademark laws, mostly extolling how necessary it is to secure such a trademark and how relatively simple it is. Nothing much in the article that we have not been saying here since our inception, but since it

China trademark registrationChina Daily ran an article today, entitled, “IP Special.” The article talks about a number of pending and recently resolved lawsuits involving foreign companies:

  • The Walt Disney Company filed a lawsuit in Shenzhen, alleging “Mickeyle,” a Shenzhen-based children’s clothing manufacturer, illegally uses Disney’s registered trademark “MICKEY & CO” and “MICKEY UNLIMITED.” Disney