My firm has been gearing up for a couple of CIETAC commercial arbitrations against Chinese companies and one thing we can state with near certainty is that neither will settle. The reason for this is Chinese companies virtually never settle their in-country litigation matters. In the United States, something on the order of 97% of

The Legal Insight Blog has a long and comprehensive post, entitled, “Overview of Doing Business in China” [link no longer exists]. And that is exactly what it is. Written by King & Wood, one of China’s leading law firms, the post sets out the basics of China’s systems as they relate to business and

Major apologies to John Lennon.

Arbitration provisions fascinate me. They are the Rodney Dangerfield of the legal world in that they get no respect, not even among international lawyers.  This is a mistake.

I can nearly always judge the legal thought that went into an agreement through its arbitration/litigation provision alone. I usually can

On October 10, 2006, the American Bar Association will be putting on a teleconference called “China: The New Frontier in Arbitration.”  The conference will be on “available dispute resolutions for companies that are doing business in China” and it will examine arbitration issues that arise both before entering into an agreement and after a dispute

A couple weeks ago, an American company contacted us about representing them before the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC) in Beijing.  The American company claimed to be owed hundreds of thousands of dollars by a Chinese company that had failed to make final payment on a large piece of industrial