China employment law webinar

Our lead China employment lawyer, Grace Yang, will be leading a 90 minute webinar on what HR departments need to know about China employment law, and boy is that a lot. Go here to sign up.

It’s been about ten years since China enacted its “new” labor law and it is flat-out unbelievable how much has changed since then. I can remember how controversial it was back then when we first started writing about it. Way back in September, 2008, I wrote a post, entitled, China’s Brand New Labor Law Regulations. It’s All Here. I remember well getting an e-mail from a client (no less) angry at me for even writing about it. His argument was something along the lines that by my even writing about it as though it “might” be followed was a “wasteful joke” because all it would do is cause “paranoid” foreign companies to abide by the law and further damage their ability to compete against their China company peers.

My response was that we believed China would relatively quickly start enforcing its employment laws and would initially do so especially as against foreign companies. That was our theme from day one and many were unhappy about it. Emails poured in from people claiming we were writing about China’s employment laws just to gin up work for ourselves and it was ridiculous to believe China would ever enforce them and either we knew that and were trying to rip people off or we were just plain stupid. My response was always the same. I would emphasize that there were a lot of social and economic reasons for these laws and we fervently believed they would be enforced, though likely slowly and over time. I would then talk about how important it is for foreign companies to abide by Chinese laws.

I told you so!

Today (and probably for the last five years at least), virtually nobody operating in China is not mindful of its employment laws and, blissfully, I don’t think we’ve gotten any hate mail on such laws for nearly a decade. And our China employment law practice is booming.

In the early days of China’s employment laws, we divided the work among our team of China lawyers, but as enforcement of the employment laws increased and as the rules surrounding those laws proliferated and became highly localized, it became apparent we needed a lawyer who would focus on China employment law. See China Employment Law: Local and Not So SimpleGrace Yang is that lawyer for us. Grace has law degrees from top law schools in China and the United States and last year she wrote THE book on China employment law: The China Employment Law Guide: What You Need to Know to Protect Your Company. Buy it! 

Our China employment work these days consists mostly of the following:

  1. Helping foreign companies with employees in China avoid employment law problems, either from the Chinese government or from their own employees. In large part, Grace does this by performing employer audits and then remedying the mistakes found. See China Employment Compliance and Audits: THE New Big Thing.
  2. Helping foreign companies that come to us with a specific and usually urgent employee problem. These problems can range from fending off a lawsuit or a regulator to figuring out what to do with a bunch of employees that will be brought on via a merger deal or will be terminated due to an office or company shut-down.
  3. Helping expats negotiate enforceable contracts with their China employer.

About a third of our China employment law work comes from lawyers, about a third comes from HR professionals and about a third comes from company owners/managers and employees.

Now about this upcoming China employment law webinar. It’s going to be on Tuesday, October 23 at 1 p.m. Eastern Time and it has been approved for 1.5 general recertification credit hours toward PHR, SPHR, and GPHR recertification through the HR Certification Institute. It also will get you 1.5 PDCs for the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP.

It will be geared towards “HR, in-house counsel, financial officers, and company presidents.”

It is being put on by HR Webinar Company and they describe it as follows:

China’s employment laws are complicated and highly local. Foreign companies doing business in China face complex China labor and employment issues and questions every day – often without even realizing it. What works in the United States has very little in common with what works in China. Employment compliance has become one of the most important issues foreign companies face in China and it is the rare foreign company that gets it right. Employee disputes are becoming considerably more common and government enforcement is getting significantly more stringent. It virtually always costs less for your company to deal proactively with China employment law issues than to wait to address them only after they devolve into a dispute. It is therefore imperative that you understand the framework of China employment law and steps you can take to mitigate risk.

Please join Grace Yang as she helps you better understand the China employment law landscape. She will focus on helping you recognize key China employment issues and on giving you guidance on how to solve real-life China employment law issues and problems.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

This webinar will cover the following:

YOUR CONFERENCE LEADER

Your conference leader for “China Employment Law: What HR Needs to Know” is Grace Yang. Grace heads Harris Bricken’s China employment law practice and contributes a weekly column about China employment law issues for the multi-award winning China Law Blog. Grace received her B.A. degree in law from Peking University and her J.D. degree from the University of Washington School of Law. She represents both China employers and employees in their China employment law matters. Grace published a book entitled The China Employment Law Guide.

If you have China employees, you really do not want to miss Grace’s upcoming webinar.

I got a badly written and vituperative email yesterday in response to my post, On the Impact of China Tariffs: Is This a Dead Cat Bounce? In my post I predicted a large decline in manufacturing orders from China, starting in the next few months. The email accused me of “hating China” and wanting “to impede its peaceful” rise and of being “jealous of its progress.” All this because we have been writing of late how so many of our law firm’s own clients and so many others are leaving China, or looking to leave China. We have been getting quite a lot of these sorts of emails lately.

Guess what people. Our post about foreign companies leaving China have nothing to do with our feelings regarding China and everything to do with what we are hearing and seeing. Our statements of fact about companies leaving China are not being made out of animus to China, but out of a desire to tell the truth and help foreign companies figure out what to do about China going forward. Life would be far easier and economically lucrative for us if foreign companies were not running for an exit from China. But from what we see, they are.

We are telling the truth about companies (not just American companies) looking to leave China because part of what we do is help companies legally fulfill their goals and their plans. My firm’s international lawyers help companies negotiate their exits from China and we help companies figure out where to go instead of or in addition to China. We also help companies looking to set up in other countries, do deals involving other countries, protect their IP in other countries, and draft necessary contracts in other countries. In the last few months our international lawyers have been being kept nearly as busy with countries like Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Turkey, India and Pakistan as with China.

The above is but an introduction to what we see as China’s diminished future for foreign companies. Since pretty much the inception of the US-China trade war we have been saying that we do not see its end because we have always seen it as more than a trade war. At first, we saw the US tariffs as an effort by the United States to get China to “open up” and “act right” on things like the internet and IP. But because we did not see China changing on these things, we did not see the trade war ending.

Vice-President Pence’s speech on China earlier this week has only reinforced for me that the trade war between China and the US will not be ending any time soon, if ever. The New York Times has called that speech the Portent of a New Cold War between the United States and China and China’s own Global Times wrote an article entitled, Pence speech shows Washington’s tougher policy on China. Don’t blame us. We are just the messengers. Things are getting very tough between China and the United States right now and the trade war is just a symptom of that, not the disease.

The United States is aggressively and unabashedly doing what it can to isolate China and to remove it from the world of international trade. The new free trade agreement between the United States and Canada is further proof of this as it essentially blocks Canada and Mexico from engaging in free trade with China. See What Trump’s new trade pact signals about China. Word is that shutting out China is going to become a regular thing in all new U.S. trade agreements. See US Commerce’s Ross eyes anti-China ‘poison pill’ for new trade deals. Will the EU and Japan and Latin America play ball on this? I predict that most if not all of them will.

So yes, the above is why we will continue to write about what North American and Latin American and European and Australian businesses should be doing to deal with the new normal regarding China. We are writing these things because we value our credibility and because we presume our readers value our no-holds barred advice — threatening emails or not.

For more on the new normal, check out the following:

And just in case you still believe we are saying the above for political not business reasons, here is your palliative: a great book that asserts the United States is blaming China for the US’s own ills: Blaming China It Might Feel Good but it Won’t Fix America’s Economy, by Ben Shobert, a good friend of mine. Ben — what are you seeing out there in terms of companies looking to leave and/or leaving China? 

What are you-all seeing out there?

So far nobody has written to factually dispute that many (most?) foreign companies are looking to leave and/or are leaving China, but we certainly would welcome such information if you have it! 

UPDATE: An international lawyer friend just sent me a link to this blog post by Renaud Anjoran over at the Quality Inspection Blog. Renaud heads up a top-flight quality inspection/product sourcing company out of Shenzhen, China, but his post was written from Vietnam and is entitled Transferring Production from China to Vietnam to Avoid Tariffs. Renaud’s post is essentially a how to on moving production from China to Vietnam. Does anyone believe Renaud went to Vietnam and wrote this post for reasons other than because his clients too are looking to reduce their dependence on China?

 

China entertainment lawyer

On September 26, China media and entertainment lawyer Mathew Alderson will be discussing how movie and TV producers can “make the most of the opportunities China offers” as part of a FREE webinar. Go here to register.

PACT, “the trade association representing the commercial interests of UK independent television, film, digital, children’s and animation media companies,” is putting on this webinar and it describes it as follows:

To shine some light on how producers can make the most of the opportunities China offers, we have invited Mathew Alderson, Partner at Harris Bricken to take part in a webinar. Mathew is a transactional entertainment lawyer based in Beijing. He has a wealth of knowledge about the Chinese TV and Film industries and will share his experiences about working with China.

Topics to be discussed include:

–    An overview of China
–    Information about SART and how they work in the market
–    The biggest mistakes companies make when working in/with China
–    An explanation of how copyright works in China
–    The benefits of working within the co-production treaty
–    Contracts and Chinese law
–    How companies can protect their IP
–    Chinese quotas
–    Payment in China, tax, and additional costs
–    Legal representation

To register for this webinar, click here. I remind you that it’s free.

PACT (quite accurately) describes Mathew as follows:

Mathew Alderson is a transactional entertainment lawyer in Beijing. He represents major Hollywood studios, major tech companies and gaming companies, as well as independent producers and distributors. Mathew frequently advises UK companies on the structuring of projects in order to minimize the impact of quotas and other restrictions on foreign content in China. Mathew focuses on protecting his clients’ IP and reducing their exposure to payment defaults in China. He handles China theatrical and episodic projects from development through production and distribution.  Mathew is the author of the UK-China Film & TV Toolkit and a frequent contributor to China Law Blog.

We would add that Variety Magazine described Mathew as a “game-changing” lawyer rocking the movie biz for Mathew’s leading- edge work as a China entertainment lawyer.

You do not want to miss this, so go here and register.

China IP licensing

On August 23 and August 24, Law Seminars International will be putting on An Advanced Conference on Current Dealmaking Trends for IP and Technology Licensing: Tips for efficiently and effectively monetizing intellectual property. 

This event will be live at the Courtyard Marriott in Pioneer Square in Downtown Seattle and also via webinar wherever you are. Go here to get a pdf of the entire program. I will be speaking on the second day regarding “enforceable contracts as a starting point [for IP protection]: Classic pitfalls foreigners fall into when dealing with Chinese entities, like drafting in English, and other key considerations.”

Per the organizers:

Who Should Attend. Attorneys, business executives, licensing professionals, and others involved with complex licensing transactions.

Why You Should Attend.  Licenses are one way of bringing intellectual property to life. Without licenses, IP rights lay dormant until weaponized in court. Licenses allow IP to be commercialized, accessed and harmonized without resorting to aggressive enforcement. In today’s climate of constant change and tighter budgets, the ability to spot, craft, draft and negotiate license agreements efficiently and effectively is more important than ever for licensors and licensees.

This conference provides insights on developing issues arising from drafting and negotiating licenses, updates on case law, changes in technologies that impacts licensing, and the rise of new international players in IP licensing.

Join our distinguished faculty as they address the above and additional licensing issues from both outside counsel and in-house perspectives including a panel on problematic clauses and what to do about them.

What You Will Learn. 

  • ~ The anatomy of an effective license agreement
  • ~ NDAs as the courting phase of the licensing relationship
  • ~ Case law update: Recent cases impacting IP licensing values
  • ~ Assigning and licensing trademarks
  • ~ Biopharmaceutical trends including licensing for joint ventures and as a result of collaborative activities
  • ~ Compulsory licensing, Standard Setting Organizations, and FRAND
  • ~ Managing compliance
  • ~ International licensing with China
  • ~ Provisions for resolving licensing disputes
  • ~ Wrap-up: Mock negotiation of a hypothetical licensing agreement

The seminar will consist of the following:

DAY ONE

Introduction & Overview, 9:00 a.m.

Adam L.K. Philipp, Esq.
AEON Law / Seattle, WA

Ramsey M. Al-Salam, Esq.
Perkins Coie / Seattle, WA

 

The Anatomy of an Effective License Agreement, 9:15 a.m.

Core essential terms, including exclusivity, lump sum versus sales-based royalties, royalty bases and rates, exclusions, standard forms and provisions, warranties, indemnities, audit rights, keeping IP from competitors, “poison pill” provisions

Steve Tapia, Esq. , Distinguished Practitioner in Residence
Seattle University School of Law / Seattle, WA

 

NDAs as the Courting Phase of the Licensing Relationship, 10:30 a.m.

The structure and essential terms of non-disclosure agreements; the “new world” of NDAs and how they affect high tech joint ventures; lessons from the Waymo/Uber dispute about protecting trade secrets

Adam L.K. Philipp, Esq.

 

Case Law Update: Recent Cases Impacting IP Licensing Values, 11;15 a.m.

An update on how recent decisions affect the value of IP rights and the enforceability of licensing agreements

Ramsey M. Al-Salam, Esq. , Program Co-Chair
Perkins Coie / Seattle, WA

 

Assigning and Licensing Trademarks, 1:15 p.m.

The need to transfer good will and police the quality of goods sold under a license; the ability of bankrupt licensors to extinguish licensee rights and the impact on pre-bankruptcy negotiations when relations are strained; unique cannabis issues

Jerry A. Riedinger, Esq.
Perkins Coie / Seattle, WA

 

Biopharmaceutical Licensing, 2:00 p.m.

Transactional trends including licensing for joint ventures and as a result of collaborative activities

Gary M. Myles, Esq. , President & CEO
Myles Intellectual Property Law / Issaquah, WA

 

Managing IP Compliance, 3:00 p.m.

Structuring an effective process for counting royalties, tracking work product, regulatory compliance, patent marking, trademark quality control, audit rights, verifying “best efforts”, “most favored” clauses, and anticipating other issues

Neil Zoltowski , Principal
StoneTurn Group / San Francisco, CA

 

Compulsory Licensing, Standard Setting Organizations, and FRAND, 4:15 p.m.

When you have no choice: Where compulsory licensing comes into play including when it’s “necessary” to practice a standard

T. Andrew Culbert, Esq.
Perkins Coie / Seattle, WA

 

Continue the Exchange of Ideas: Reception for Faculty and Attendees, 5:00 p.m.

 

DAY TWO

International Licensing: Adapting to Recent Developments in China, 9:00 a.m.

An enforceable contract as a starting point: Classic pitfalls foreigners fall into when dealing with Chinese entities, like drafting in English, and other key considerations

Daniel P. Harris, Esq.
Harris Bricken / Seattle, WA

New rules on IP transfers; importing & exporting technology; potential impacts from recent trade negotiation; IP enforcement statutory changes, administrative enforcement, and increased damages awarded by courts

Ping Gu, Esq.
Zhong Lun Law Firm / Beijing, China

 

Provisions for Resolving Licensing Disputes, 10:30 a.m.

Choice of resolution technique in the license and choice of technique when enforcing the license: substantive and procedural considerations for choice of law; mediation and arbitration clauses; enforcement stage choice of forum

Mark Wittow, Esq.
K&L Gates / Seattle, WA

 

Wrap-Up: Mock Negotiation of a Hypothetical Licensing Agreement, 11:15 a.m.

Identifying what is most important to your opponent; provisions to tailor the agreement to the type of license and situation; anticipating potential problems from changes in control and adverse events; tips for working through problematic provisions

Steven B. Winters, Esq. , Moderator
Lane Powell / Seattle, WA

Licensee perspective

Jeff Harmes, Esq.
Karcher Harmes / Bainbridge Island, WA

Licensor perspective

Hillery L. Nye, Esq. , General Counsel
Zipwhip / Seattle, WA

I know or know of many of these attorneys and I am very much looking forward to hearing their talks and I urge anyone with an interest in IP go here and sign up. If you use HARRIS as your promo code, you will get a 50% discount.

China IP webinar

Today (June 26) at 1 p.m. Eastern, I will be putting on a 90 minute webinar on protecting your IP from China.

This webinar is with Commercial Law WebAdvisor and they describe it as follows.

Companies often cannot afford not to do business in China. Whether producing goods there or selling to the Chinese market, companies that engage in business with Chinese partners need up-to-date legal advice on how to protect their technology and other intellectual property (IP) interests from being counterfeited, pirated, or otherwise misappropriated. As IP theft is one of the top issues facing businesses operating in China, there are substantial risks companies must identify and address proactively to protect their valuable IP assets. Deals made in China can threaten IP rights not just in China, but in markets around the world. Understanding the Chinese IP landscape and how to manage the pertinent issues can go a long way to safeguarding your client’s valuable IP interests.

Please join Dan Harris as he explores the nuts and bolts of constructing a good business deal with a Chinese partner, what your agreements should include, and how to manage the Chinese IP rights framework to minimize your client’s IP-related risks.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

This webinar will cover:

  • How to choose a good Chinese partner
  • Identifying the IP assets that need protection
  • How to structure your deal
  • Drafting your deal papers
  • Drafting China employee contracts to protect your IP
  • IP registrations: What you should know about trademarks, patents, copyrights, and licensing agreements
  • AND MUCH MORE!

YOUR CONFERENCE LEADER

Your conference leader for “Doing Business in China: Structuring Your Deal and Protecting Intellectual Property” is Dan Harris. Dan is an attorney with Harris Bricken in Seattle. He is internationally regarded as a leading authority on legal matters related to doing business in China and in other emerging economies in Asia. Forbes MagazineBusiness WeekFortune MagazineBBC NewsThe Wall Street JournalThe Washington PostThe EconomistCNBCThe New York Times, and many other major media players have looked to him for his perspective on international law issues.

Dan writes and speaks extensively on Chinese law with a focus on protecting foreign businesses and his China Law Blog is regarded as one of the best law blogs on the web today. The ABA Journal recently named the China Law Blog to its Blawg Hall of Fame (a designation given to the top 20 law blogs of all time).

Please go here to register and use promo code cwa18bc for a small discount.

China employment lawyerOn May 16 (at 1 p.m. Eastern, 10 a.m. Pacific and 5:00 pm. Greenwich Mean Time) Grace Yang, our lead China employment lawyer, will be putting on a webinar with HRWebAdvisor. Grace’s talk will last about 90 minutes and will run the gamut on China’s employment laws, with a particular focus on what foreign companies with China employees need to do not to run afoul of the myriad and complicated national and local employment laws. HRWebAdvisor describes Grace’s talk as follows:

China’s employment laws are complicated and highly local. Foreign companies doing business in China face complex China labor and employment issues and questions every day – often without even realizing it. What works in the United States has very little in common with what works in China. Employment compliance has become one of the most important issues foreign companies face in China and it is the rare foreign company that gets it right. Employee disputes are becoming considerably more common and government enforcement is getting significantly more stringent. It virtually always costs less for your company to deal proactively with China employment law issues than to wait to address them only after they have come via a dispute. As such, it is imperative that you understand the framework of Chinese employment law and steps you can take to mitigate risk.

Please join Grace Yang as she helps you better understand the Chinese employment law landscape. She will focus on helping you recognize key China employment issues and give you guidance on how to solve real-life China employment law issues and problems.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

This webinar will cover the following:

  • The basics of China’s employment law rules
  • How to draft an employment agreement that works for your China locale
  • How to draft China employer rules and regulations (aka employee handbooks)
  • The other agreements you should consider for your China employees
  • Frequently contested issues, such as overtime, vacation days, commission payments, and leaves of absence
  • Employee terminations
  • HR audits AND MUCH MORE!

YOUR CONFERENCE LEADER

Your conference leader for “Chinese Employment Law Landscape: Key Issues and Staying Compliant in the Local Market” is Grace Yang. Grace heads Harris Bricken’s China employment law practice and contributes a weekly column about China employment law issues for the multi-award winning China Law Blog. Grace received her B.A. degree in law from Peking University and her J.D. degree from the University of Washington School of Law. She represents both China employers and employees in their China employment law matters. Grace published a book entitled The China Employment Law Guide.

Don’t miss it. To sign up for the live or recorded webinar, go here.

Doing Business in China EventI will be speaking at an international business event in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on May 9, entitled, Unlocking Global Opportunities. For more information, go here.

Who should attend? Any business operating internationally or hoping to do so.

Why attend?

  • Grow your international sales
  • Develop a strategic global plan
  • Network with hundreds of people from manufacturing, service & logistics industries
  • Keep current on the latest international trade issues with industry experts
  • Hear high-caliber speakers discuss their experiences in international markets
  • Leave with new ideas.

What will go on there?

The agenda will include the following:

  • Governor’s Export Award Winners
  • Luncheon Keynote Speaker (invited)- Elizabeth Erin Walsh – Assistant Secretary for Global Markets and Director General of the U.S. & Foreign Commercial Service; U.S. Department of Commerce International Trade Administration
  • International Café – Roundtable discussions with peers & subject matter experts
  • 5 Breakout Sessions:
    –     Unlocking the Tax Code
    –     Global E-Commerce: The Great Equalizer
    –     Compliance
    –     Transportation: Enhancing Wisconsin’s Competitive Advantage
    –     International Growth Strategies
  • Networking Reception

More specifically, the event will consist of the following:

7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.   Networking

8:00 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.  Breakfast

9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.  Networking Break

9:45 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. International Cafe — Roundtable Sessions with International Experts.  This session to give business owners and managers an opportunity to discuss specific issues and challenges of selling internationally with subject matter experts. A total of 6 roundtables will focus on multiple functional areas of interest. During these 90-minute sessions, the roundtables will turn every 25 minutes, allowing individuals to participate in 3 discussions. The roundtable topics will be as follows:

9:45 to 11:15  Federal Tax Code Changes and Your International Business.  The following speakers will help you make sense of the recent tax code changes as they relate to your international business, including how the new federal tax code can spur economic growth for your company.

9:45 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.  Global E-Commerce: The Great Equalizer.  In this session, John Worthington and Samantha Soffici of IBT Online, will give you an opportunity to learn from E-Commerce experts and international company leaders who have built substantial business revenue through global E-Commerce sales, both B2B and B2C. Take away tactical tips and learn how to execute your E-commerce strategy, from global demand generation, to website localization, to the platforms best suited to your products and customer base.

  • The Global E-Commerce Marketplace: Successfully penetrating E-Commerce in China and E-Commerce platform for SMEs
  • International Online Marketing & Website Localization: How do websites help exporters? A Look at selecting a web address, SEO, web hosting and localization and Informational vs. transactional websites.
  • E-Commerce: A WI Company Perspective Best practices for an International on-line strategy, Issues/obstacles vs. success/growth and Business Impact of E-commerce

11:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Networking Break

11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Lunch — Growing and Protecting Wisconsin Companies Globally – Keynote Speaker: Elizabeth Erin Walsh – Assistant Secretary for Global Markets and Director General of the U.S. & Foreign Commercial Service; U.S. Department of Commerce International Trade Administration

1:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Networking Break

1:45 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Compliance.  In this session you will hear from both the legal and the manufacturer’s perspective regarding the staples of trade compliance, including the hottest and most current topics. Together with practical examples and time for Q&A, this session is relevant for new and experienced exporters. The speakers for this session will be the following:

1:45 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Transportation: Enhancing Wisconsin’s Competitive Advantage. This session will examine strategies to improve the logistics of Wisconsin’s exports. Using case studies, panelists will discuss alternatives and best practices in food, beverage and agricultural transportation. Attendees will gain an understanding of how food companies can better transport product to market – whether through cold chain, leveraging rail, and/or maximizing value. The speakers will be the following:

1:45 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Creative Growth Strategies. Whether you rely on distributors, manufacturers reps, licensing agreements, franchise agreements, or you do it all yourself, doing business internationally requires due diligence, formal agreements, and IP protections. I will be speaking at this session, along with the following people who will discuss their specific strategies to enter new international markets.

3:15 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Networking Reception.  


Sounds great, what do I need to do to go? 
Go here for full details and to sign up.

See you in Milwaukee on May 9!

China trademarks and IP protections I will be speaking today (April 25) in Barcelona at a Red Points event on international and China IP protection. The event will be on the eve of World International IP Day and it will be to celebrate Red Points’ launching of its online brand and trademark platform that will offer free lessons on detecting, validating and enforcing intellectual property rights across the internet.

This event will be live-streamed on April 25th as well, at 9:00 AM PST, 12:00 PM EST, 6:00 PM CEST. For more information, go here and to register go here.

It’s all FREE and there will be an hour or so of networking after the talks, which will include substantial time for questions. I will be focusing on how education is so important in this space, mostly by highlighting real life worse case scenarios that have been created because companies simply did not know what they needed to do to protect their intellectual property from China. The key point: Many (most?) Chinese manufacturers are no longer content just making products for foreign companies. They now want to make AND sell their own products. This means you need to do various things to prevent Chinese manufacturers — especially your own Chinese manufacturer — from registering “your” trademark in China and then copying and selling your product worldwide.

To avoid your company being part of my next China trademark mistakes speech you should both attend this event (either live or via live streaming) and you should check out the following:

I hope to see you there.

 

 

China IP protectionsOn the evening of April 25, I will be speaking live in Barcelona at a Red Points event on international and China IP protection. The event will be on the eve of World International IP Day and it will be to celebrate Red Points’ launching its online brand and trademark platform offering free lessons on detecting, validating and enforcing intellectual property rights across the internet.

This event will be live-streamed on April 25th as well, at 9:00 AM PST, 12:00 PM EST, 6:00 PM CEST. For more information, go here and to register (it’s all FREE), go here to register.

 

China employment lawyerOn April 18, Grace Yang, our lead China employment lawyer, will be putting on a webinar on “Employment Laws for Female Workers in China.” To call this webinar timely would be an understatement, as the issues involving female employees in China could not be more relevant/topical/important.

The live webcast will be this Wednesday, April 18, 1:00-3:15pm PST / 2:00-4:15pm MST / 3:00-5:15pm CST / 4:00-6:15pm EST.

LawProCLE, who is putting on this webinar, describes it as follows:

Foreign companies doing business in China face complex China labor and employment issues every day and issues related to female workers require additional attention. The Chinese government has high expectations regarding how employers must treat female employees, especially those who are pregnant, nursing or on maternity leave. Employers need to know and follow the national, provincial and municipal laws and regulations regarding protection of female employees. Female employee disputes are increasingly common in China and both the government and the courts are getting increasingly tougher against employers that fail to treat their female employees appropriately.

This webinar will give you the information you need to spot employment law issues relating to your female employees and arm you with ways to avoid and mitigate problems.

Grace’s talk will focus on the following:

  1. The key China employment laws on protection of female workers
  2. The employer rules, regulations and policies you need for your China employees
  3. What you need in your employment toolkit to reduce your risk of sexual harassment claims
  4. Female employee special leaves
  5. Female employee terminations
  6. China employer audits

LawProCLE describes Grace as follows:

Grace focuses on international business and China law. She is Harris Bricken’s lead attorney on China labor and employment law and recently authored a book entitled the China Employment Law Guide. Grace is admitted to practice law in the States of New York and Washington. Grace received her bachelor’s degree from Peking University School of Law (“Beida”) and her J.D. from the University of Washington School of Law. During law school, Grace won “Best Written Contract” in the University of Washington Contract Drafting & Negotiation Competition and the Pro Bono Student of the Year Award for her involvement in several community-based volunteer legal service projects.

Grace has spoken at a ton of seminars and webinars on various different aspects of China employment law and always to rave reviews and you do not want to miss this one.  For more information and to sign up, click here.