China Movie and Entertainment Law
                                                                                                                                                       Image via www.vpnsrus.com

Over the past few days, reports have emerged of a proposal to open China’s market to foreign streaming services. According to Tech Node, Beijing News reported that China would “allow foreign firms to provide … streaming services … by the end of the year”. This would be

China entertainment lawyer

Our lead China entertainment attorney, Mathew Alderson (who Variety Magazine named as one of the 50 most influential entertainment lawyers) will be speaking on a panel at the Westin St. Francis, San Francisco, on June 28. The panel is entitled “The Impact of Regulatory Changes on China’s Entertainment Sector: Trends and Challenges.” Mathew’s

China entertainment lawyer

The pace of change is so rapid that it’s always hard to keep up with developments in China. What made sense last month often makes no sense this month. Here’s my attempt to make sense of what’s going on in video streaming right now.

1. More subscribers

As recently as four or five years ago

On September 20th, 2018 China’s film and TV regulator, NATR, published a discussion draft of the Provisions on Administration of Import and Broadcasting of Overseas Audio-Visual Programs. The provisions apply to “overseas” films, TV programs, animation and documentaries. “NATR” is the National Administration of TV and Radio, the result of a recent restructuring of

China movie lawAs everyone who follows the Chinese film industry already knows, the would-be blockbuster Asura had one of the strangest and most ignominious openings in film history last weekend. With an estimated budget of US $113 million, it ranked as the most expensive domestic production of all time, and featured a high-profile international cast and crew