Steve focuses on assisting foreign companies in doing business in and with China. He prides himself on working in the “real” China: the world of factories, fish plants, and farms that lie outside of Beijing and Shanghai. Having mastered the Chinese language and legal system, Steve’s unique expertise makes him an invaluable resource to our clients.

China risks

I recently participated in a publicly broadcast round table discussion on the US-China trade war. This discussion was organized in response to President Trump’s recent announcement that the U.S. will on September 1 be imposing 10% tariffs on a new list of Chinese products. Many analysts were surprised by this move. They treated the announcement

Presidents Xi and Trump prepare for a meeting next week at the G20 event with the purported goal of restarting negotiations to resolve the Section 301 tariff dispute and other trade issues between the U.S. and China. Many analysts and business people from both countries are confident this meeting will lead to resolution. Unfortunately, this

International trade lawyers

After the trade talks with China broke down, the PRC government immediately announced measures designed to support the development of Chinese semiconductor manufacturing. On May 8, the State Council under the guidance of Li Keqiang announced it would extend a long standing series of Chinese government policies supporting the development of the domestic PRC chipmaking

China Lawyers

For more than a decade, China has blocked American tech companies from fully participating in China’s Internet boom. If you know China’s Internet-related laws for foreign companies and you have represented foreign companies trying to proft from China’s Internet, you know that in most cases, the reality for foreign companies has been much worse even

Huawei Sales Ban

As we have made clear on this blog and in our recent public discussions on the trade war, the real economic threat posed by the US-China trade war is not tariffs. The real threat has always been the U.S. government prohibiting sales of products to China or purchases of products from China. Focus on the

China IP protections

The trade talks between the United States and China broke down on Friday with no agreement. As a result, tariffs were raised to 25% and future U.S. tariffs on additional Chinese products are extremely likely. The Chinese side responded with retaliatory tariffs on a host of U.S. products. The parties will continue to negotiate, but