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With a background working in Hangzhou, Shanghai, and Seattle, Sara Xia has earned a reputation for overcoming communication barriers and helping people of diverse backgrounds connect with one another. She is uniquely equipped to identify and solve issues related to Chinese entities, while providing clients with critical insight on the cultural customs and procedures necessary to successfully conduct business in China.

Sara works out of Harris Bricken’s Seattle and Beijing offices, advising clients on legal practices in both China and U.S. Her practice focuses on cybersecurity, data protection law, and privacy law. She also works on mergers and acquisitions, corporate formations, business litigations, and matters involving China’s foreign exchange control policies.

China unreliable entity list

On September 19, China’s Ministry of Commerce (“MOFCOM”) issued the Regulations on Unreliable Entity List (“Regulations”), which took effect on the same date. Though we have not seen an actual list of unreliable entities, the Regulations set out the general principles for the Unreliable Entity List (UEL) system.

Who can be included on the

Forming companies in China: Like a Maze
Forming companies in China: Like a Maze

As part of the supporting regulations relating to the Foreign Investment Law (FIL), China’s Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) and State Administration for Market Regulation (SAMR) issued the Measures for Foreign Investment Information Reporting (the “Reporting Measures”). Under the FIL and the Reporting Measures, all

China's New Foreign Investment Laws

It’s been nearly two months since China’s new Foreign Investment Law (FIL) took effect, bringing sweeping revisions that ostensibly make China more hospitable to foreign investors. But has anything really changed? Or is the new law just window dressing?

The coronavirus outbreak has provided a convenient (and unassailable) rationale for anything that is or

China cybersecurity lawyers

China’s Cyberspace Administration Office recently issued Regulations on Network Protection of Children’s Personal Information (《儿童个人信息网络保护规定》) to take effect on October 1, 2019. These regulations set out general rules regarding online collecting and processing of personal information of children under the age of 14.

General Duties of Network Operators

According to the regulations, network operators shall:

China internet litigationFollowing on the heels of China’s first internet court in Hangzhou, two more internet courts have recently been established  in Beijing and Guangzhou. In the meantime, China’s Supreme People’s Court published the Provisions on Several Issues Concerning the Trial of Cases by the Internet Courts, 最高人民法院关于互联网法院审理案件若干问题的规定 (link in Chinese) (“Provisions”), clarifying the types of

China cryptocurrency

The Shenzhen Court of International Arbitration (SCIA) of China recently published a case analysis on contract disputes between parties to a share transfer agreement involving cryptocurrencies.

In this case, an unnamed applicant engaged the respondent to manage and invest in a pool of cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash and Bitcoin Diamond) on behalf of the applicant.