Photo of Mathew Alderson

Mathew is an international transactional lawyer and corporate advisor with a focus on entertainment, technology, and creative industries. Mathew represents major Hollywood studios and producers on both motion picture and television projects, and he leads Harris Bricken’s China media and entertainment practice from Beijing.

China copyrights

Sports broadcasts aren’t recognized as copyright subject matter under Chinese statute law although they have been accepted as such in some of the Chinese case law. This makes it necessary for sports brands, such as leagues or their licensees, to tackle piracy using Chinese anti-unfair competition laws. These laws are considered less desirable because the

China Music royaltiesChina is digital. Its music market is almost entirely digital. Physical sales here comprise only about 20% of the total market.  China has more than twice as many internet users as the US has people. There are about 900 million mobile internet users here, 70% of whom consume music online. That means there are around

China copyright movies and TV

China’s copyright law, in its present form, has been in place since 2010 and numerous proposals for amendments have been floated since that time. The National People’s Congress recently released another draft amendment and solicited public comment. As far as I can tell, this would be the 5th draft since 2010.

In a recent post

China copyright music streaming

China’s copyright law presently gives the owner of the copyright in a sound recording a right of approval and a right of remuneration when a recording is communicated to the public through an information network. These are considered neighboring rights because they are not included in the rights comprising the copyright in the sound recording.