Photo of Griffen Thorne

Griffen is an attorney in Harris Bricken’s Los Angeles office, where he focuses his practice on advisory, litigation, and regulatory matters across a wide variety of industries. His litigation practice includes patent, trademark, trade secret, copyright, entertainment, false advertising, unfair competition, and complex commercial disputes throughout the United States. In that capacity, Griffen has argued (and won) many dispositive and other motions, participated as a member of trial and arbitration teams, and argued before the California Court of Appeals.

In addition to litigation, Griffen’s practice also includes trademark prosecution and non-litigation enforcement of intellectual property rights. Griffen is a Certified Information Privacy Professional in the United States (“CIPP/US”) and Europe (“CIPP/E”), and he assists clients in data breach counseling and response, compliance with privacy laws, and drafting website privacy policies.

Prior to beginning his legal career, Griffen studied music at the University of California, Berkeley, and attended law school at Loyola University of Chicago, where he was the Editor-in-Chief of the Loyola University Chicago Law Journal.

In his free time, Griffen enjoys traveling and studying languages.

California import lawsBuying products overseas and importing them to the U.S. is no easy task. Companies have to worry about compliance with foreign laws and regulations (often with a language barrier and in a very different legal system) and strict and complex U.S. import rules. It is easy for companies to lose sight of the many U.S.

California IoT law A few days ago, California passed the first U.S. information security law specifically targeting the Internet of Things (or IoT). We wrote about the lawSB-327, about a year ago when it first passed. SB-327 has gotten relatively little press compared to California’s other pioneering data protection statute, the California Consumer Privacy Act

Data privacy attorney

Many of our China clients sell their products and services to the United States. And because nearly all these companies sell to California, the China Law Blog editors asked me to write about how California’s rapidly advancing privacy and data security laws impact foreign companies that do business with California. I have been tasked with