Photo of Fred Rocafort

Fred is a former diplomat who joined Harris Bricken after more than a decade of international legal experience, primarily in China, Vietnam, and Thailand. His wide range of experience includes starting and operating his own business in Asia, working as an in-house counsel for a Hong Kong-based multinational, as well as many years as a State Department official, providing a client-centric perspective to his legal work. Fred co-hosts Harris Bricken’s weekly Global Law and Business podcast, which covers legal and economic developments in locales around the world to decipher global trends in law and business with the help from international guests.

Fred began his career overseas as a U.S. vice-consul in Guangzhou, China, adjudicating thousands of visa applications and advocating for fairer treatment of American companies and citizens in China and for stronger anti-counterfeiting enforcement. After entering the private sector, Fred worked at a Shanghai law firm as a foreign legal advisor and later joined one of the oldest American law firms in China. He also led the legal team at a Hong Kong-based brand protection consultancy, spending most of his time out in the field, protecting clients against counterfeiters and fraudsters from Binh Duong to Buenos Aires.

Fred is an ardent supporter of FC Barcelona—and would be even in the absence of Catalan forebears who immigrated to Puerto Rico in the mid-1800s. An avid explorer of Hong Kong’s countryside, he now spends much of his free time discovering the Pacific Northwest’s natural charms.

International Trade Glossary terms

Every community has its lingo, and the international trade community is no exception.  Lawyers who work on international matters have a good chance of running across some of that lingo, even if they are not working on a trade matter as such. In fact, in my experience, it’s rare for international contract work not to

Imports

On August 26, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced plea agreements with Ambiance Apparel (“Ambiance”) and its owner Sang Bum “Ed” Noh. The charges against Ambiance and Noh include a duty evasion scheme, which worked like this:

Ambiance imported clothing from Asian countries and submitted fraudulent invoices to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

Hong Kong for international business

Say what you will about the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) but, when it comes to repressing Hong Kong’s democratic aspirations, it means business. Having concluded local authorities were not up to the task of ruling Hong Kong by its iron-fisted standards, Beijing made short work of the “one country, two systems” framework and imposed a

China counterfeit lawyers

As we have written a number of times — see China Trademarks are the Most Important Thing of All and China’s New Trademark Environment — the essential first step in most any China IP strategy is to register your trademarks with China’s Trademark Office. Because China is a first-to-file country, until you register a trademark

The U.S. has ordered China to close its consulate in Houston. Having received word of their impending closure, staff at the consulate began to burn documents in a courtyard. According to the State Department, the move was taken “to protect American intellectual property and Americans’ private information.” Senator Marco Rubio’s description of the