I am a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

I mostly represent companies doing business in emerging market countries. It has taken me many years to build my network and it takes constant communication and travel to maintain it. My work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland's interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

I was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, I am AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), I am rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (its highest rating), and I am a SuperLawyer.

I am a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and I constantly travel between the United States and Asia. I most commonly speak on China law issues and I am the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog (www.chinalawblog.com). Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed me regarding various aspects of my international law practice.

I am licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at my firm, I focus on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.

China joint venture lawyersHuge swaths of China’s manufacturing sector are being thrown for a loop. Large numbers of foreign buyers of Chinese manufactured product have ceased or reduced their manufacturing in China and even larger numbers are looking to do so. Chinese manufacturers are rightly concerned and our manufacturing lawyers are seeing the results of that like

China Law Blog Social MediaWhen we first started writing this blog in 2006, we were able to be a lot more free-wheeling than today because the odds of the Chinese government blocking us were much lower back then.  We want this blog to be visible in China and so we write our posts to not get too close to

China lawyers
Because of this blog, our China lawyers get a fairly steady stream of China law questions from readers, mostly via emails but occasionally via blog comments or phone calls as well. If we were to conduct research on all the questions we get asked and then comprehensively answer them, we would become overwhelmed. So what

China work cultureI was interviewed the other day by a reporter working on an article on why Chinese companies so often fail outside China. I think the thesis of the article will be cultural differences. After we spoke, this reporter sent me links to some of what he had read for background and particularly liked.
I read

International Manufacturing Lawyers

This is part one in a new series on the legal side of having your products manufactured ex-China.

Ten years ago, our international manufacturing lawyers would frequently need to spend 10-20 minutes with clients and potential clients, justifying the benefits of having NNN Agreements and Manufacturing Agreements with Chinese manufacturers.  And then another 10-20 minutes