Photo of Arlo Kipfer

Arlo is based in Bogotá, where he advises clients on Latin America and China business issues. Before moving to Bogotá, Arlo lived in China for almost two decades, guiding the development and compliance efforts for multinationals in Asia, and also in Europe and the Americas. In addition to his wide-ranging international practice, Arlo spends much of his time on international education issues. Arlo has advised clients on the establishment of several independent and joint venture international schools and he is a frequent speaker at international school conferences. 

While in China, Arlo worked extensively with companies, international nonprofits and educational organizations. He is a strong negotiator in Mandarin and English and Spanish, even in environments that strongly favor the “home team.” Having been immersed in Chinese law and culture for so long, Arlo is especially adept at helping foreign and Chinese businesses communicate with each other as clearly and effectively as possible, both in and with English and Spanish-speaking countries. 

CrackdownChina is (again) in the midst of a concerted government crackdown against foreign companies doing business in China. And if that is not bad enough, if your country has been deemed by China to have disrespected it by speaking out against forced labor or enhancing diplomatic relations with Taiwan, your own expatriate staff themselves may

International school law

Yesterday, in part 1 of this two-part series, I discussed how choosing your local partner and your legal structure are important to consider in establishing a new international school. In today’s post, I am going to focus on the importance of choosing the right deal structure and protecting your IP.

3. Choosing the Right

International Schools Lawyer

Demand for English-based and Western-style education is still running high in many countries around the world. An ever-increasing number of wealthy locals want to prepare their children to attend elite universities abroad and this has created clear demand for suitable schools.

However, starting a private school in a foreign country is actually very difficult even

China WFOEMany years ago, we helped a foreign school “conglomerate” set up a number of schools in China and due to “word of mouth” we have been getting calls and emails regarding China school set-ups ever since.

Many of those communications come from ESL teachers who see a need and want to fill it, but truth