China Lawyer

Way back in 2006, in China’s Five Surprises, we did a short post listing out five things that surprise people about China. This post was based on a 2005 paper, called “China’s Five Surprises,” written by Dr. Edward Tse.  Out of the blue, a China lawyer friend of mine sent me a link to that post yesterday with a note saying: “Things were so much simpler and more innocent back then, weren’t they?” Yes, they sure were.

The paper listed the following as the five surprises:

1.  Many Chinese companies are already more than simply low cost competitors and even more of them will compete on quality in the future.

2.  We should expect Chinese companies to become more innovative over time.

3.  China has been able to draw top people from around the world, accelerating business competence.

4.  “Out from Guanxi.” Guanxi is overrated and rapidly declining. “High-quality management and transparent governance structures count more.”

5.  Chinese companies are going overseas.

At the time we had this to say about Dr. Tse’s paper:

This paper does an excellent job discussing where China business is today and where we can expect it to be in the future. Our own experiences cause us to agree with all five of these themes and we have already discussed some of these on our blog, here, here, here and here.  No controversial stand here, but we also agree with Dr. Tse that neither the “China will take over the world” nor the “China will crash and burn” scenarios reflect the reality on the ground in China.

My thoughts on the five today are as follows;

  1. Undisputed today. No longer a surprise.
  2. Undisputed today. No longer a surprise.
  3. Mostly true.
  4. Mostly true, but role of government has not declined and, if anything, has probably increased.
  5. Yes, but they are generally not terribly adept at it.

Your thoughts?

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Photo of Dan Harris Dan Harris

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network. 

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network.  His work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland’s interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

He was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), is rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (also its highest rating), and is a recognized SuperLawyer.

Dan is a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and constantly travels between the United States and Asia. He most commonly speaks on China law issues and is the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog. Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed Dan regarding various aspects of his international law practice.

Dan is licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at his firm, Dan focuses on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.