How to form a china wfoe

Our China lawyers are often asked about the steps it takes to form a China WFOE. So often, in fact, that we long along drafted a stock response to that question. Figuring this response would be helpful to you-all, our faithful readers, I am running it below. Please note that the below is a generic roadmap for WFOE formation and the exact details for forming a WFOE in China will depend on, among other things, the WFOE’s business scope and the city/district in which the WFOE will be formed.

Generally, if all goes smoothly, the overall process will typically take 3-5 months. We do not breakdown each of the steps as to time because the time involved for each step can vary wildly, depending on (for instance) how long it takes to prepare financial information, negotiate a lease, obtain documents from the landlord, authenticate relevant documents, and validate the corporate structure. Lately though the Chinese authorities have been quite efficient in processing applications, at least in the major cities and usually once we have provided them with all of the requested information in the exact format they need, they usually provide a response within 2-3 weeks. It is getting to that point that takes so much time.

Generic WFOE Formation – Roadmap

A. Name Approval Application

  1. WFOE Investor(s): corporate structure chart, authenticated corporate documents, passports and other documents identifying key personnel.
  2. Business Scope: define scope of business.
  3. Registered Capital: determine amount of capital to be invested, pursuant to financial projections.
  4. Total Investment Amount: determine maximum investment amount (capital + investor loans).
  5. Capital Contribution Timeframe: default is within 30 years.
  6. Proposed Chinese Name(s) for WFOE: at least 6-10 choices.
  7. WFOE Address: dependent on lease/office space.
  8. Name Approval Application Form: prepared by your lawyers, signed by client.

B. During Formation Process

  1. Select accountant.
  2. Select bank.
  3. Draft labor and employment documents: employment agreements, WFOE rules and regulations, non-compete agreements, confidentiality agreements, etc.

C. Post-Formation

  1. Open bank account.
  2. Carve chops.
  3. Open social insurance accounts and begin tax reporting.
  4. Other post-formation activity as relevant.

For more on what it takes to form a China WFOE, check out the following:

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Photo of Dan Harris Dan Harris

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network.  His work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland’s interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

He was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), is rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (also its highest rating), and is a recognized SuperLawyer.

Dan is a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and constantly travels between the United States and Asia. He most commonly speaks on China law issues and is the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog. Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed Dan regarding various aspects of his international law practice.

Dan is licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at his firm, Dan focuses on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.