China sourcing contracts

China sourcing is complicated. And that’s talking strictly about the non-legal side of it. Our China lawyers who draft manufacturing contracts (typically NNN Agreements, Product Development Agreements and Contract Manufacturing Agreements) have seen enough mistakes to write a book. Well someone sort of just did. Renaud Anjouran, of Quality Inspection Blog, essentially just did, in his post, China Sourcing 101: the 15-Part Guide for New Buyers. He describes it as a “15-part series for new buyers who are starting to work with Chinese suppliers (and for more experienced people who want to double-check whether they are working in a smart way)” and it consists of the following 15 articles:

  1. Do You Need a Sourcing Agent?
  2. How to Identify Potential Suppliers?
  3. How to Verify a Manufacturer
  4. Second Choices vs. “Never Again”
  5. Negotiation: The Terms you Need to Discuss
  6. Keep Some Leverage with Suppliers
  7. Pre-Production: Describing What You Want
  8. Project Management of Your Orders
  9. Check Quality Early in the Manufacturing Cycle
  10. Always Verify Quality Before Shipment
  11. Build Good rapport with Suppliers
  12. How Closely Do You Follow Your Productions?
  13. The 5 Steps to Developing a Chinese Supplier
  14. How a Factory Can Improve Quality
  15. How a Factory Can Improve Productivity

If you want help in figuring out how to better source your product from China, I suggest you work your way through this series. And if you want help on the legal side, I suggest you read some or all of the following:

China Factory Problems: Always YOUR Fault?

How To Get Good Product From China; Specificity is THE Key To Your OEM Agreement.

China OEM Agreements. Ten Things To Consider

China OEM Agreements. Yet Another Reason To Have One

China Supply Agreements. Why The “Perfect” OEM Agreement Should Cost Less

OEM Agreements With Your China Supplier. Not Just For The Big Boys

China OEM Agreements. Why Ours Are In Chinese. Flat Out

The Five Steps To Successfully Buying Product From China.

China Manufacturing Agreements. Make Liquidated Damages Your Friend.

How To Get Bad Product From China With No Legal Recourse.

Any questions?

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Dan Harris

I am a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

I mostly represent companies doing business in emerging market countries. It has taken me many years to build my network and it takes constant communication and travel to maintain it. My work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland’s interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

I was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, I am AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), I am rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (its highest rating), and I am a SuperLawyer.

I am a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and I constantly travel between the United States and Asia. I most commonly speak on China law issues and I am the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog (www.chinalawblog.com). Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed me regarding various aspects of my international law practice.

I am licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at my firm, I focus on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.