China employer audits China employment lawyers

As I have previously written, no (foreign) employer is too small for China’s regulators and in some respects the smaller you are, the more you need one. I say this because when a company with 5,000 employees has a problem with five employees, it’s not that big a deal, but when a five-employee company has a problem with two employees, it can be such a big and costly problem as to cost the company its China business. To be a well-protected employer in China, you need a well-written China employment contract and a China-centric set of Rules and Regulations, no matter your company size.

China’s employment laws are strict and protective of employees at all companies, especially those that are foreign-owned. If you as an employer fail to follow all mandatory employment laws, your employee will pursue you regardless of your size. Our China employment lawyers constantly get questions from China employers after they have been reported and/or sued by an employee China employee — mostly Chinese but increasingly non-Chinese as well.

The below is an amalgamation of the sorts of emails we frequently receive:

I cannot believe that I just got served with a lawsuit by one of my former Chinese employees. We are a small business and we pay all our taxes and we have always treated all of our employees right, including this one. We paid her really well and we were never late with her wages and we even gave her extra vacation days. We also paid all of her mandatory employee benefits and a few optional ones as well. We always did our best with her. And then she quit, completely voluntarily, and yet she is now suing and claiming we owe her double her monthly wages for not having a written employment contract with her? As you can see, her demand is totally unreasonable.

We then have to explain that with no written employment contract the employer stands virtually no chance in this arbitration.

It is not uncommon for foreign employers in China to state that they have done or are “doing their best” with respect to treating their employees well and following China’s complicated (and localized) employment laws. The problem is that neither the Chinese government nor its courts nor arbitral bodies care how hard you try. Your other law-abiding actions are not a mitigating factor in determining the penalty you will need to pay for having failed to enter into a written contract with your employees or for whatever other violation you may have committed.

The burden is on you as the employer to ensure you have a proper written employment contract fully executed by the parties. The best practice is to have your new employee sit down and sign a hard copy of the employment contract on her first day and you then retain an original copy of the fully executed contract for your records.

Consider this hypothetical. Employer asks Employee to sign a hard copy of the employment contract during the on-boarding process. Employee says: I will need some time to review this and I will take it home to read and I will return a signed copy. Employer says okay, but the Employee never returns a signed copy. Employer never makes an effort to “track down” that contract. Employee sues months or years later seeking a penalty from the employer for failing to use a written employment contract. Under this scenario, the Employer will be liable to Employee for failing to execute a written employment contract. If this sort of scenario sounds unlikely to you, let me just tell you that nearly every time we audit a company’s employment situation we find some percentage of employees working without signed contracts.

Now same facts as above, but Employee returns a signed copy with a fake signature. What will happen? Based on real cases with similar facts, Employer will probably be held liable for an employer penalty because there is no written employment contract bearing Employee’s actual signature, unless Employer has convincing evidence Employee faked the signature to “cheat the system” (which is a high evidentiary bar to meet).

If you are not sure you have current written employment contracts for all your employees, now would be a good time to check on this and fix it.