China lawyersSmart Chinese manufacturers know that with their costs rising, they need to be able to distinguish themselves from their peers. One of the ways they are choosing to do this (even more frequently than in the past) is by copying and selling products they are making for their foreign customers. See Your China Factory as your Toughest Competitor. 

Why is this so dangerous? Because bad things nearly always happen when Chinese manufacturers discover their American/European/Australian product buyers will soon be ceasing to buy from them. For this reason, we instruct our clients to line up their new suppliers and have them ready to go, before even hinting that they might be having a problem with their Chinese manufacturer that may lead them to seek out another supplier. We are giving this same advice to companies that come to us wanting to switch suppliers after having learned that their existing supplier is copying and selling their products.

We give this advice because over the years our China lawyers have repeatedly seen the following:

  • Western company tells its China manufacturer it will be ceasing to use China manufacturer for its production. China manufacturer then keeps all of the Western company’s tooling and molds, claiming to own them. The way to prevent this is to get an agreement from your Chinese manufacturer that you own the tooling and molds before your Chinese manufacturer has any inkling that you will be moving on. For more on the importance of mold agreements, check out How Not To Lose Your Molds In China and Want Your China-Based Molds? You’re Probably Too Late For That.
  • Western company tells its China manufacturer that it will be ceasing to use China manufacturer for its production. Western company then learns that someone in China has registered the Western company’s brand names as trademarks in China. Western company is convinced that its China manufacturer is the one that did these registrations, but has no solid evidence to prove this. Western company is now facing not being able to have its product — at least with its own brand name — manufactured in China. See 8 Reasons to Register Your Trademark in China.
  • Western company tells its China manufacturer it will be ceasing to use China manufacturer for its production. A few weeks later, Western company has its products seized at the China border for violating someone’s trademark. The Western company is (rightly) convinced that its China manufacturer is the one behind the product seizure, believing the Chinese manufacturer registered the Western company’s brand names as trademarks in China long ago and is just now using that trademark to seize product as revenge. China has laws forbidding its manufacturers from registering the trademarks of those for whom it manufactures, but because it is usually not possible to prove that your manufacturer in Shenzhen had a cousin in Xi’an do the registering, this sort of thing goes on unchecked. This sort of thing is increasingly happening with design patents as well. For how to prevent this from happening to you, check out the following:
  • Western company tells its China manufacturer it will be ceasing to use China manufacturer for its production. China manufacturer then says it will not be shipping any more product because Western company is late on payments and owes X hundreds of thousands of dollars. China manufacturer then reports Western manufacturer to Sinosure and Sinosure then ceases to insure product sales to this Western company, which can have the effect of convincing Chinese manufacturers not to sell to the Western company without getting 100% payment upfront. For more on Sinosure’s role regarding China exports, check out China Sinosure: What You Need to Know.

So yes, switching your China manufacturer can be risky, at least when done without sufficient planning.

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Photo of Dan Harris Dan Harris

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network. 

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network.  His work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland’s interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

He was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), is rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (also its highest rating), and is a recognized SuperLawyer.

Dan is a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and constantly travels between the United States and Asia. He most commonly speaks on China law issues and is the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog. Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed Dan regarding various aspects of his international law practice.

Dan is licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at his firm, Dan focuses on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.