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Goodbye Peking Duck.

The Peking Duck blog officially closed today. I am not the sentimental type and to a great extent, everyone knew this day would soon arrive. But yet today is still a sad day.

The Peking Duck was at one time one of the two or three best and most honest blogs on China. Through that blog, I got to know its author Richard Burger and I am proud to think of him as a friend. Richard and I most certainly did not agree on many things (though there were many things on which we did agree), but I ALWAYS appreciated his blog posts because they were also so “real.” They were also always so very well written and so insightful. Richard always was and still is a class act.

When we first started our blog way back in January, 2006, and for a long time after that, no day would go by without our reading Peking Duck, as it (along with a few other blogs that are also no more (many of which Peking Duck lists in its farewell post) was the zeitgeist of China.

If you wanted to know China, you read Peking Duck. It was that simple

To give you some idea of how important we viewed the Peking Duck, I note that this is the 40th time we have cited to it in a blog post and that from 2006 to  2008, we cited to it 23 times, which I am guessing was more than any other publication. If we were having a tough time coming up with a good topic for the day, we knew we could pretty much always find something worthy of discussion on Peking Duck.

Richard never pulled a punch and yet he, like so many of us back in “those days,” was infused with optimism. Sorry, but it was a better time.

Not surprisingly, Peking Duck’s last paragraph nails it:

It was a thrilling ride. I used to love waking up to hundreds of new comments. It was a real community. But all good things must end, and I probably should have shut down the site a few years ago instead of allowing it to slowly die on the vine. Thanks so much for joining me here. I’ll miss all of those who contributed to The Peking Duck — the site was more about the participants here than it was about me. What a great experience it was. Thanks again.

It is with considerable sadness that I join the long line of people mourning the final demise of Peking Duck and wishing Richard all the best in his offline life.

It was indeed a “great experience.”

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Photo of Dan Harris Dan Harris

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network.  His work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland’s interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

He was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), is rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (also its highest rating), and is a recognized SuperLawyer.

Dan is a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and constantly travels between the United States and Asia. He most commonly speaks on China law issues and is the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog. Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed Dan regarding various aspects of his international law practice.

Dan is licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at his firm, Dan focuses on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.