For many reasons, we have so far pretty much stayed away from the Google-China kerfuffle. The most important reason for our not writing about it is that we simply do not see ourselves as having anything new or noteworthy to add to the debate. That has not really changed in that about all I am doing today is cribbing from a really thought provoking Absurdity, Allegory and China (AAC) post, entitled, “Google Buzz and China.
So why now and why that post?
Well, that post posits that Google has debuted Buzz now as a bargaining chip in dealing with the Chinese government. Buzz is, right now, pretty much the only major Western social networking platform with a nice channel into China. Now I have no idea what Google’s intent was in putting Buzz live when it did, and I do not even really much care.
But what I do care about and is another point AAC raises, which is that if Google refuses to uncouple Buzz from Gmail and if China refuses to back down on its restrictive policy on Western social networking sites, Gmail end up, shall we say, losing its way in China, and that would be a huge deal.
It would be a huge deal because almost without exception, every ex-pat in China uses gmail in one capacity or another.
Google in China just got a little more interesting.
What do you think?
Comment Warning. If you use words in your comments that could trigger bad things, I will change them.

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Photo of Dan Harris Dan Harris

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network. 

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network.  His work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland’s interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

He was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), is rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (also its highest rating), and is a recognized SuperLawyer.

Dan is a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and constantly travels between the United States and Asia. He most commonly speaks on China law issues and is the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog. Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed Dan regarding various aspects of his international law practice.

Dan is licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at his firm, Dan focuses on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.