The Wu Way blog, provides the best analysis I have seen on how China views last night’s election of Barack Obama as America’s next president. The post is entitled, “How does China view an Obama Presidency…what does China think of Obama?” and it sees China (to the extent one can generalize about 1.3+ billion people) as “excited about the election as a historic moment, but also cautious in their concern that he may be more protectionist.”
It is well worth a read.
UPDATE: China Beat also does an excellent job on this in its post, “Obama Elected, China Reacts.
FURTHER UPDATE: This does not exactly fit here, but I liked it so much and it is election related, so here goes. I just read an excellent article over at Spot-On, by Jeanne Jackson, entitled, “The Day After.” The article, and, in particular, the following paragraphs, summed up better my feelings than even my own feelings, and certainly better than anything I could write myself:

Perhaps you are celebrating today. Or, perhaps, you are annoyed. I certainly hope, whether you backed the winner or loser, you are being gracious about the outcome. I will almost sell my first-born to purchase a one-way ticket for the first moron who sneers about moving to Canada because his candidate lost.
It is, perhaps, an old-fashioned idea, but I’ve always had a certain amount of respect for the office of the presidency, no matter who occupies it. Granted, over the centuries we’ve had our share of . . . um. . .characters. And, believe me, I’ve been a victim of presidential policy more times than I’ve benefitted.
But I am in awe of the process and its relatively peaceful outcome. I am in awe of the fact that there are two people willing to risk the biggest, most public of all losses and always do so with class and dignity. For that reason, I can’t hate a president (though I can pray to a merciful God for deliverance from incompetence).

Damn, that’s some good stuff.

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Photo of Dan Harris Dan Harris

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network. 

Dan is a founder of Harris Bricken, an international law firm with lawyers in Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, China and Spain.

He primarily represents companies doing business in emerging market countries, having spent years building and maintaining a global, professional network.  His work has been as varied as securing the release of two improperly held helicopters in Papua New Guinea, setting up a legal framework to move slag from Canada to Poland’s interior, overseeing hundreds of litigation and arbitration matters in Korea, helping someone avoid terrorism charges in Japan, and seizing fish product in China to collect on a debt.

He was named as one of only three Washington State Amazing Lawyers in International Law, is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory (its highest rating), is rated 10.0 by AVVO.com (also its highest rating), and is a recognized SuperLawyer.

Dan is a frequent writer and public speaker on doing business in Asia and constantly travels between the United States and Asia. He most commonly speaks on China law issues and is the lead writer of the award winning China Law Blog. Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Investors Business Daily, Business Week, The National Law Journal, The Washington Post, The ABA Journal, The Economist, Newsweek, NPR, The New York Times and Inside Counsel have all interviewed Dan regarding various aspects of his international law practice.

Dan is licensed in Washington, Illinois, and Alaska.

In tandem with the international law team at his firm, Dan focuses on setting up/registering companies overseas (via WFOEs, Rep Offices or Joint Ventures), drafting international contracts (NDAs, OEM Agreements, licensing, distribution, etc.), protecting IP (trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and patents), and overseeing M&A transactions.