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Exclusivity In China Distribution Agreements.

Posted in Legal News

Going through my emails and came across one from co-blogger Steve to a client on how to handle exclusivity on a China distribution agreement for a retail product. Nothing earth shattering here, but since our clients for whom we do China distribution agreements frequently ask us about exclusivity, I figured putting this up on the blog makes sense.  

This responds to your questions about how exclusivity issues in these sorts of distribution agreements are usually handled in China. These are the ways it is typically addressed from the perspective of the manufacturer of the product:

1. Provide for a non-exclusive agreement. Note, however, that two distributors in the same market is usually not a workable situation. Option two below is therefore more common.

2. Limit the territory. You could limit this particular distributor to City1/City2/City3.

3. Limit the term to one year, with you having the exclusive right to renew. This is a very common solution when the product does not require the distributor to put in extensive time or money to create the sales market. This solution is not common if the distributor will need to put in extensive time or money to create the market.

4. Provide for a specific sales target. If the distributor reaches the sales target, renewal is automatic. If the distributor fails to reach the target, you have the option to terminate and appoint other distributors. Usually the sales term is for three to five years, with the sales targets set for each year.

Some agreements provide for automatic renewal at the end of the initial term with a fixed percentage increase in sales targets. Other agreements require negotiation of a new agreement with negotiation of new sales targets as part of that process. This approach is most common where the distributor will expect to invest considerable time and expense in the early years of the distribution cycle to create a market for the product.

In our experience, option 3 is the most common in China. Chinese companies seem to have a problem with negotiating specific sales targets. Worldwide, options 3 and option 4 are common, depending on the specific circumstances.

What have you done?  What have you seen?

  • http://www.bpplawschool.com/ law degree

    I’m currently studying law in london but would like to head to china once I have graduated for a while, just spitballing ideas at the moment and was looking for some advice – how long does the law conversion course take to be able to practice in china?

  • Breanna D.

    I have seen pretty much exactly what you describe. Though if you are a really big company and have a super desirable product or products, you certainly do have more leverage.

  • G. Distributing

    I have seen EXACTLY what you have described and my company has acted accordingly.