I admit it. I think I like China Smack. I know I drop by there every once in a while and though I often feel like taking a shower afterwards, I keep going back. Truth From Facts does a good job describing what China Smack is all about and, in doing so, explains its appeal:

ChinaSMACK is one of my favorite new China blogs. It translates some of the hot topics in China’s online forums and bulletin boards, complete with pictures, video, and numerous reader comments translated from the original Chinese posts. The author seems to favor the more lurid stories, such as a confrontation in Wuhan between a Wuhan bus driver and several passengers.

Half of me feels like I am learning more about real life in China by reading China Smack, but the other half just flat out finds it fascinating. Its most recent post is on a handicapped street artist and like so many of its posts, the comments are equally riveting. The commenters bemoan the lack of opportunity for the handicapped in China.
Check it out and let me know what you think.

  • It is a sad thing and China could tap a larger talent and consumer pool by opening up opportunities and access for physically handicapped people. The only industry I know of that actively employs handicapped people are the “blind man” massage places and the real ones are government owned (versus some of the “Stevie Wonder” impressions I’ve seen at private ones, dark shades and all).

  • Nik

    I agree it is like a train wreck, but I do not like it or their spammy way of advertising.

  • Kai

    LoL @ the shower afterwards comment. I like what Joel said over on Fool’s Mountain about a lot of things Chinese netizens write that foreign observers and blogs sometimes miss when we get too deep into the political side of all things China. chinaSMACK does a good job showing some of the sides of China that these other blogs/sources miss. Sometimes its funny, cute, hilarious, or even dirty (making you want to shower afterwards), but I agree that they’re every bit a part of what China is as all the other political commentary and controversy we often embed ourselves into. I know I’ve taken to commenting on there and while I anticipate the comments section there being overrun with the usual pro/anti-China musings that plague other websites like GVO or Peking Duck, I hope they keep producing the same content.
    @ Nik: What spammy way of advertising? Google Adsense? Come on, give them a break. I’m pretty sure hosting fees need to be paid and it isn’t as if there are pop-ups or anything.
    Hell, your own website (www.stanosheck.com)has no less than 3 different advertising sections. Holy toledo, and I just noticed its a website to sell overpriced 10MB sub-domains (for $52/yr!). Please don’t tell me you’re calling chinaSMACK “spammy.” You’re kidding me, right? LoL.
    Disliking it for its content is one thing, calling it spammy is another. We should encourage Chinese people like Fauna or Aw Guo @ ifgogo.com or the venerable Wang Jian Shuo for all the English-content they produce about China.

  • Dan

    Greg,
    It will happen eventually. It has too. Capitalism does that. Smart business owners see an underutilized resource and they take advantage of it. The commenters seemed to realize this.

  • Dan

    Nik,
    Can you be more specific?

  • Dan

    Kai,
    I completely agree with you. One of the strengths of the Chinese blogosphere is the different voices out there. Of course I don’t always agree with all of them and sometimes some of them may figuratively cause me to look away, but that does not mean they in any way do not contribute to a greater understanding of what is really going on out there. One of the things I strive to do on my blogroll is to look at blogs based on their quality, not their viewpoint. I define quality as contributing to the discussion, not stifling it. I am planning a big update to my blogroll, which I have to admit is long overdue. We obviously need more than just outsiders looking into China and commenting, we need insiders looking around as well, and by insider, I mean native Chinese.

  • Kai wrote: “chinaSMACK does a good job showing some of the sides of China that these other blogs/sources miss. Sometimes its funny, cute, hilarious, or even dirty (making you want to shower afterwards), but I agree that they’re every bit a part of what China is as all the other political commentary and controversy we often embed ourselves into.”
    I couldn’t agree more.