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China Corruption By The Numbers. With Your Help, Coming Soon To An Internet Near You.

Posted in China Business

Received an email the other day from TRACE International asking us to plug their excellent BRIBEline website that seeks to document global corruption. The website records anonymous reporting of bribe demands:

Bribeline is a secure, multi-lingual website through which companies and individuals can anonymously report the bribe demands they receive. Making a report on BRIBEline is quick and easy. The online survey is available in Chinese and 20 other languages. Completing the survey involves answering no more than ten multiple-choice questions. No names are requested or collected, the individual is not asked if the bribe was paid, and reports made to BRIBEline are not used for investigations or prosecutions. From the reports, we hope to get a grip on what groups are demanding bribes, where they are demanding them, and under what circumstances.

I am not aware of any other websites or organizations attempting to collect this data and I urge all of our readers who have experienced such “requests” to document them on BRIBEline, which has been endorsed by the World Bank.
For more on corruption in China, check out the following:
– “Corruption In Asia: China Is Ten Out Of Thirteen
– “China Corruption. It’s A Guy Thing?
– “The Upside Of China Corruption
Clients are constantly asking us about corruption in China and what they should do when asked to pay a “little extra.” Our unfailingly advice is not to pay. The risks of getting sucked in to having to pay more or of getting caught are just too high. Always. Any deal that requires such risks is not worth doing. Perhaps most importantly, nearly every time one of our clients has refused to pay the bribe (this is true of China and elsewhere), the deal goes through anyway.

  • Steven Blayney

    “Clients are constantly asking us about corruption in China and what they should do when asked to pay a “little extra.” Our unfailingly advice is not to pay. The risks of getting sucked in to having to pay more or of getting caught are just too high.”
    In my view, one problem is that bribery tends to be an incremental process that people get sucked into over time. It may start out as what may seem to be a “small favor”, e.g., “Would you help to fill out my daughter’s US college application?” Next may come the college recommendation letter, etc., etc. This process puts one on the “slippery slope”.

  • JG

    Without verifying the nature of the bribe, and by allowing people to submit what are, at best, allegations, this website doesn’t have a lot going for it.
    Lets say for instance I don’t like company X. Reason? Could be any, really. Have a couple of people log a few complaints of bribes solicited, and bam!
    I could see how a lawyer would like this site though, haha.

  • http://www.chinalawblog.com Dan

    Steven Blayney,
    Exactly. That is what I meant when I mentioned the risks of “getting sucked in.” I should have been more explicit, but you are exactly right. It starts with the small things and then how does it stop?

  • http://www.chinalawblog.com Dan

    JG,
    I suggest you actually check out the site.

  • http://www.whataboutclients.com/archives/2008/07/china_corruptio.html What About Clients?

    China: Corruption by the Numbers.

    I have been living in or doing business with corrupt countries for over thirty years and one of the things I have noticed is corruption far more often runs with men then with women… –Dan Harris, China Law Blog…

  • kevin daigle

    there is a web site in china to help with corruption. do you have any info on this. Having situations on getting deeds for property, opposing parties are paying off the right people causing problems.